Food plot question

Question, tips about Habitat, food plots and Quality Deer Management

Food plot question

Unread postby tomcbigbucks » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:29 am

Ok I attached a aerial of proposed food plot.

Currently area is mowed once a year and is weeds and some briars.

Biggest issue is the woman is trying to get approval for organic farm so can use anything not approved as non organic.

Was thinking clover down in the lower area as it is downhill and stays a little moister. Doesn't flood or stay soggy.

Second area was thinking a mix of alfalfa and chickory.
Janicefoodplot.jpg
Janicefoodplot.jpg (150.84 KiB) Viewed 1942 times


Want to draw and hold deer early and late, do have the bedding area with the overgrown fields.
North is to the top.


Whats the thoughts, what could we accomplish?
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Teddy Klark » Wed Mar 04, 2015 1:04 pm

Great area, looks like both areas get good sunlight too. What I would recommend is the bottom or lower part spraying the weeds with any kind of weedkiller, waiting 2 weeks either turning the dirt or just raking it down to bare dirt. And planting clover, it is a fantastic plot as it feeds deer all spring through fall and even into winter some. Its does wonders for lactating does who are nursing fawns, as it has high protein levels. On the upper part I would suggest a Brassicas mix or turnip mix. It is a great fall through winter food source so it is awesome for hunting the late season as it provides an easy food source for deer all through the winter. It also aids in shed hunting, again because it will concentrate deer during the shedding months. Brassicas are easy to plant, and feed the deer 2 ways, through the leaf production during fall and early winter. And then the bulbs which they will dig up and go crazy for after the freeze, which turns the bulbs sweet. But be careful, do not plant your brassicas to early, if you do they will essentially rot before the freeze, and the deer won't touch them.
When I have a large area like this to plant I always try to plant clover and brassicas, it is like a 1-2 punch combo. Essentially you will be feeding deer the entire year, from April to November/December with the clover. And from November to February/March with the Turnips.
North Ridge Wildlife Forage has a fantastic Clover blend called "Mountain Monster Clover", uses 0 junk seed, 5 types of clovers all high end, providing a great blend. And their Brassicas mix called "Forage Greens" again uses 0 junk seed. Its a blend of 3 different turnips, 1 radish and rape. It grows aggressively, has great leaf and bulb production, easy to plant. You can order from the website http://www.northridgewildlifeforage.com And their Facebook page has a lot of helpful tips on it as well http://www.facebook.com/NRWFS
I hope this was helpful, any more questions please feel free to ask!
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Teddy Klark » Wed Mar 04, 2015 1:05 pm

Oh and in the lower section I see a few trees, these won't bother the clover either so you can leave them standing!
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby biggamecameraman » Wed Mar 04, 2015 1:12 pm

Teddy we will ejoy reading your post what a boat load of information :D :D :D
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Phillyarcher » Wed Mar 04, 2015 2:10 pm

Hey Tom,
When we did our food plots we used round up to kill everything and then we added lime for the PH to get it were we needed to be. The clover,chicory and alfalfa are what we used and they were in it all the time, it was so good they would not come out of it. As far as the organic not sure how you would go about that. The clover that we used was red and white we mixed them all to gether and it was fine. We tried keeping it about 6" also. Hope you get what answers you need. Good luck
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby tomcbigbucks » Wed Mar 04, 2015 2:23 pm

Thanks for the answers teddy and offer Philly, I'll let you know.

Is there any weed killer that is approved for use on an organic farm??
For this lady if it is not it will be a deal breaker
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Teddy Klark » Wed Mar 04, 2015 2:44 pm

As far as an organic weed killer I really have no idea, I would google organic weed killers and see what comes up! Good luck and please let us know what you find out!
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby B B » Wed Mar 04, 2015 5:25 pm

Tom, About five years ago I planted red and white clover in my backyard. I never used any fertilizing or anything to help it along and it comes back strong every year and the deer mow it down spring and fall. I'm also going to try planting a plot this spring in one of my deer spots and will definitely use the clover again. I would also like to find something else to add in there that is maintenance free because mowing it throughout the summer may not be an option.
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Buckman37 » Wed Mar 04, 2015 5:33 pm

First, you should start out by taking a soil sample. You can get a test kit from your local ag extension office and when you fill out the paperwork, you will get recommendations for lime and fertilizer based on what you want to grow. The pH is most important to address and the sooner the better because it takes lime time to react in the soil.

You can figure out your soil type by using this website:
http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/HomePage.htm

As far as having an organic burndown, we used this stuff at work in our organic research plots:
http://www.norganics.com/label/GMSpecimenLabel.pdf

For fertilizer, you can use any type of manure to remain organic. The least messy way to accomplish this is to use pelletized chicken manure like this:
http://www.perdueagrirecycle.com/

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.
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Re: Food plot question

Unread postby Cricker » Wed Mar 04, 2015 6:24 pm

Tom, i did a few last year in similar looking spots. One in alfalfa and one in brassica. I had to add a half ton of lime to get the ph at 7. Thats make it or break it right there. I have some example pics for you from both. First is the alfalfa. I never hunted this spot but it was getting torn up. It should be a lot fuller this year.
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Spring after seeding.
image.jpg
Early summer.
image.jpg
The last pic i took sometime in august after final mow.
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